The Ultimate Guide to Understanding Flower Types and Symbolism

~ A ~

A to Z ~ Flowers Types + Symbolism + Colours + More, Guide.

A Flowers Guide.

The letter A marks the start of the alphabet and the beginning of our flower guide. It is fitting that the letter A also signifies the start of many stunning and fascinating flowers. From the delicate Abatina to the bright Zinnia, the flowers that begin with A are diverse and colourful, sure to delight our readers and floral enthusiasts. Let’s explore some of these beautiful plants and discover more about their characteristics, uses, and histories.

One flower that starts with A is the Faux Abatina, a lifelike imitation of the real flower. While it may not be as well-known as some other flowers, the Faux Abatina is a beautiful choice for those looking to add some artificial greenery to their home or floral arrangements. Another flower starting with A is the Faux Acacia, which is known for its realistic appearance and high-quality materials. This cheerful and vibrant flower is a popular choice for home decor and other applications.

Continuing on our journey through the world of faux flowers and other incredible plants beginning, their colour meanings and symbolism with the letter A, we encourage you to keep reading and discover more about these captivating plants.

Abatina

Symbolises ~ Fickleness

Little is known about this flower. From what we do know is the genus name is Abatia in honour of Pedro Abad y Mestre (1747–1800), a Spanish apothecary and professor of botany in Seville, Spain.  It was first described and published in Fl. Peruv. Prodr. Vol.78 on table 14 in 1794.

Acacia

Symbolises ~ Beauty, Platonic love and Friendship.

Acacia is a genus of flowering plants belonging to the family Fabaceae, which also includes legumes such as beans and peanuts. There are over 1,200 species of Acacia, which are native to tropical and subtropical regions around the world, including Africa, Asia, and the Americas.

Acacia flowers are typically small and yellow or white, and they grow in clusters or spikes. The flowers are often fragrant, with a sweet or spicy scent. Many species of Acacia have showy flowers that are attractive to bees, butterflies, and other pollinators.

Acacia plants are often used in landscaping and horticulture due to their attractive flowers and ability to thrive in a variety of soil and climate conditions. Many species of Acacia are also used for medicinal purposes, such as the treatment of wounds and respiratory infections.

Acacia trees are also important for their wood, which is durable and resistant to rot. The wood is often used for furniture, construction, and fuel. In some parts of the world, Acacia trees are also used for shade and erosion control.

Acacia plants are known for their ability to tolerate dry conditions, and many species are well-suited for xeriscaping (landscaping with drought-resistant plants). However, some species of Acacia are considered invasive in certain areas, due to their ability to outcompete native plants and disrupt ecosystems.

In addition to their flowers and practical uses, Acacia plants have cultural significance in many parts of the world. In Australia, Acacia trees are considered sacred and are used in indigenous rituals and ceremonies. In Hinduism, the Acacia tree is associated with the god Krishna and is often used in ceremonies and rituals. In the Old Testament of the Bible, Acacia wood is mentioned as being used for the Ark of the Covenant.

 

Acacia Rose

Symbolises ~ Platonic Love, Chaste Love.

Ever since ancient Egypt, the Acacia rose flower has symbolised immortality and purification. Acacia Rose is considered as a sign of love or affection. It is full of charm and elegance. It’s a flower that is sure to please any person it adorns, which makes it the perfect gift to give for any special occasion. Acacia Rose Flower symbolises unconditional love and is an excellent choice for expressing love to your beloved ones on Valentine’s Day.

Acacia Rose Flower, as the name suggests, belongs to the Acacia genus. A popular choice among florists, the flower is usually used during weddings and hence can be considered a symbol of love.

Additionally, the Acacia Rose can also symbolise dignity and eternity. It blooms at very difficult times such as wars, famine & natural disasters and provides a feeling of hope and faith to people. The purest essence of this flower is hope.

Acacia Yellow

Symbolises ~ Pride, Unity, Peace, Hope, Light and Life.

The Acacia Yellow flower, also known as the Golden Wattle, is a species of flowering plant in the legume family. It is native to Australia and is the national floral emblem of the country. The Acacia Yellow flower is known for its bright, golden yellow colour and its delicate, fragrant blooms.

The main colour of the Acacia Yellow flower is, as its name suggests, a bright and vibrant yellow. The flowers are small and dainty, with a fluffy appearance due to their numerous stamens. They are often used in Bouquets and arrangements, adding a pop of colour and cheer to any setting.

The Acacia Yellow flower has a long and fascinating history in Australia. It was first used by Indigenous Australians for medicinal and ceremonial purposes, and has been a popular choice for floral arrangements for centuries. It was officially declared the national floral emblem of Australia in 1988, and is now a symbol of pride and patriotism for the country.

In terms of symbolism, the Acacia Yellow flower has a number of meanings in different cultures. In Australia, it is seen as a symbol of national pride and unity, and is often used in patriotic displays and celebrations. In other parts of the world, it is seen as a symbol of happiness and joy, and is often given as a gift to bring cheer and positivity.

When purchased and placed at a cemetery or grave site, the Acacia Yellow flower can symbolise a number of things. It could be a tribute to the life and memory of the person who has passed away, and a way to honour their legacy. It could also be a symbol of hope and optimism, and a reminder of the bright and beautiful things in life.

Overall, the Acacia Yellow flower is a bright and cheerful plant with a long history and a wide range of meanings and symbolism in different cultures. Whether given as a gift, used in a wedding, or placed at a cemetery, it is a thoughtful and meaningful choice that is sure to bring comfort and solace to those who receive it.

Acacia White ~

Symbolises ~ Elegance, Unconditional Love.

The Acacia White flower, also known as the White Wattle, is a species of flowering plants in the pea family. It is native to Australia, but has been widely cultivated in other parts of the world for its beautiful and fragrant flowers.

The main colour of the Acacia White flower is, as the name suggests, white. The flowers are small and delicate, with a sweet and delicate fragrance that is often used in perfumes and essential oils. The Acacia White flower is known for its long-lasting blooms and is often used in floral arrangements and bouquets.

The history of the Acacia White flower can be traced back to the early 19th century, when it was first introduced to Europe from Australia. It quickly became popular for its delicate beauty and sweet fragrance and was often used in gardens and as a decorative plant in homes.

In terms of symbolism, the Acacia White flower has a wide range of meanings in different cultures. In some cultures, it is seen as a symbol of purity and innocence, due to its white colour and sweet fragrance. In others, it is seen as a symbol of love and devotion, as it is often given as a gift to loved ones.

In the Western world, the Acacia White flower is often associated with weddings and is a popular choice for wedding bouquets and centrepieces. It is also a popular choice for funerals and memorial services, symbolizing purity and innocence.

In the Eastern world, the Acacia White flower has a different set of meanings. In Japan, it is seen as a symbol of immortality and is often used in funeral wreaths and grave decorations. In Hindu mythology, the Acacia White flower is associated with the goddess Lakshmi and is used in temple offerings and rituals.

When purchased and placed at a cemetery or grave site, the Acacia White flower can symbolize a number of things. It could be a tribute to the purity and innocence of the person who has passed away, or a symbol of love and devotion from the person placing the flowers. It could also be a way to honour the memory of the deceased and provide comfort and solace to those who visit the grave site.

Acalia

Symbolises ~ Temperance, Inner Beauty.

Acalia flowers are regarded as one of the most useful plants on earth in terms of medicinal properties, containing more than eighty elements that are beneficial for humans. They are also called getaway-cord or nest-cord because an insect which is unable to fly because it’s wings have been damaged covers itself in this plant and can use its leaves as a ‘rope’ to pull itself from danger.

Achillea Millefolia

Symbolises ~ Strength of character and resistance to stress and also War.

Achillea Millefolia, commonly known to the greater community as yarrow, is an herbaceous perennial flowering plant of the family Asteraceae. It can be identified by its fern-like leaves and white flowers. This plant can be used to treat gall bladder disorders, ranula, or tonsil stones.

The Achillea Millefolia flower is found in Africa, Asia and Europe.

Aconite (Wolfsbane)

Symbolises ~ Misanthropy

There are multiple plants referred to as “Aconitum”, with the most important being “Aconitum ferox”, also known as Aconite or Monkshood because it has traditionally been used by monks for its medicinal properties. In Latin, aconitum means ‘noisy’ and can be translated as ‘sounds like pain’, which aptly describes the symptoms associated with ingesting Aconite: anxiety, restlessness, hallucinations, and a dry mouth. It could not be more appropriate that this deadly flower represents an album from a band featuring a vocalist that loses his voice in the midst of recording.

Adonis, Flos ~

Symbolises ~ Rebirth, youth and immortality and in the past symbolised Painful Recollections.

Adonis is a symbolic flower that is used by Greek brides during weddings. It also shares an etymological root with the word Adonis, which means “lord” or “master of”. It’s important to note that in Ancient Greek and Roman cultures there was no one flower known as the Adonis; but rather, many types of flowers were incorporated into wedding ceremonies together, some of which did embody attributes similar to the ones seen in modern-day representations of Adonis.

Over thousands of years, it has been used in art, medicine and religious ceremonies to mark rites of passage from adulthood to old age and as a symbol of the inner spirit within all living things- testifying that life is truly cherished.

The Adonis flower is more formally known as a Shasta daisy, and the blooms generally remain open for only one day each spring.

Ageratum ~

Symbolises ~ Politeness

The Ageratum a fluffy flower come in colours of lavender-blue, pink, lilac, or white; and spread in small compound umbels. They produce small, dry fruits.

The Ageratum was most popular towards the turn of the century a flower used among florist for grouping in bouquets. Its small, fringe-like heads filled in softly around the more unyielding blossoms to tone down al harsh outlines and harmonised tints too antagonistic to each other by its unobtrusive presence.

Agrimony ~

Symbolises ~ Thankfulness

AGRIMONY, (from the Greek ἀργεμώνη) a plant well known to the Greeks and Romans, and by them very highly esteemed for its healing properties, was at one time thought superior to all others known to science as medicinal. Some authors derive the name from the Greek ”Argema, the web or pearl of the eye, a disease of which it was supposed to cure.”

Native to the temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, with one species also in Africa. The species grow to between 0.5–2 m (1.6–6.6 ft) tall, with interrupted pinnate leaves, and tiny yellow flowers borne on a single (usually unbranched) spike.

Ailanthus ~

Symbolises ~ Lofty aspirations,

AILANTHUS, luxuriant in aspect is native to northeast and central China, and Taiwan, the botanical name of which is derived from its Malay name, Ailanto, that is, Tree of Heaven. It grows to a great height, the trunk is usually very straight, and the leaves, a metre or more in length, are composed of smaller leaflets arranged along the central stem, with one at the tip, similar to the leaves of the butternut. They are abundant, and form a plentiful and delightful shade. The tree grows rapidly the wood is soft and of no utility.

Almond (Flowering) ~

Symbolises ~ rebirth and renewal.

The Almond is a beautiful little shrub, sending forth its delicate flowers in white to pale pink 3 to 5 cm diameter with five petals, crape-like blossoms early in the spring, completely covering each branch from base to apex, while the foliage is almost unseen. The ancients had a beautiful custom of wreathing poetic fables with everything, and there is scarcely a flower but what is clothed with some affecting tale of disappointed lovers. The Almond tree was said by them to have sprung from the dead body of Phyllis, princess of Thrace, who was watching for her betrothed husband’s return. On the day appointed for his arrival, she watched and waited anxiously, and at last, hopeless and despairing, killed herself upon the shore, and was changed into this shrub.

The flowering almond tree has been cherished since ancient times for its mesmerizing blossoms and ornamental traits. In Japan, the almond tree symbolizes strength, good fortune, longevity and abundance. Furthermore, in Greece it symbolizes prosperity and delicate femininity. The leaves from the blooming tree are used to make a treat that you may be familiar with-almond milk!

Almonds are known for their beautiful and fragrant flowers that blossom in a variety of vibrant hues.

Aloe ~

Symbolises ~ Greif.

The most widely known species is Aloe vera, or “true aloe”. It is called this because it is cultivated as the standard source for assorted pharmaceutical purposes

ALOE is native to tropical and southern Africa, Madagascar, Jordan, the Arabian Peninsula, and various islands in the Indian Ocean (Mauritius, Réunion, Comoros, etc.) The plant Agave americana, which is sometimes called “American aloe” Native of the tropical portions of America, although the same -species are found in the burning sands of the Eastern Hemisphere. The leaves are thick and fleshy, tapering to a point, and dentate on the edges. They sometimes grow as much as six or eight feet in length, each leaf coming out one close above the other, with no interval on the stem. The flower-stalk rises from the center of the surrounding leaves to the height of twenty to thirty feet, bearing on the summit a pyramidal panicle of numberless yellow flowers. Formerly it was said to bloom only once in a century. It is now known to bloom from eight years upward, according to the attention given it, and the region where it grows. Another variety, with smaller leaves of almost invisible green, is completely covered with white, bead-like dots, forming a striking contrast to the colour on which they rest.

Aloysia ~

Symbolises ~ Forgiveness.

preserving of all praise is the Aloysia, sometimes called Lemon Verbena. It is from Paraguay, and received its name in honour of Queen Mary Louisa, of Spain, the mother of Ferdinand VII. It is cultivated as a greenhouse shrub, for the aromatic odour of its delicate leaves, the least touch of which yields the delightful fragrance of the lemon. Frequently it is placed in the ground in summer, and in a dry cellar in winter. It should be trimmed back in the spring before the leaf buds begin to start, as otherwise it is inclined to a straggling growth. The flowers are small, appearing in spikes. They seldom bloom in this latitude. The young branches are used by florists in bouquets.

May also be known generally as Beebrushes.

 

Alyssum ~

Symbolises ~ Merit before beauty.

For the ancients, the Alyssums were supposed to possess some charmed property, which had power to control and subdue violent and ungovernable paroxysms of temper, and keep the disposition mild and passive. Its name is derived from the Greek a, not, and lussa, rage. It is a perennial of easy culture, and gladdens the garden, in spring time with its fine delicate flowers and sweet perfume. The Rock (Saxatile) Alyssum is a native of Candia, and has yellow blossoms in close corymbose bunches.

 

Amaranth ~

Symbolises ~ Immortality, resurrection, hope and resilience.

“Amaranth” derives from Greek ἀμάραντος (Amárantos), “unfading”, with the Greek word for “flower”, ἄνθος (ánthos), factoring into the word’s development as Amaranth, the unfading flower. Something that is perceived as everlasting may be described by the adjective amaranthine.

The amaranth flower is often used in cemeteries to symbolize eternal love and remembrance. The flower is believed to have never-ending life, with the ability to regrow even after being cut down. This makes it a fitting symbol for those who have passed away, as their memory and love will always live on in the hearts of those who knew them. In some cultures, the amaranth flower is also associated with immortality and resurrection, making it a powerful symbol of hope and resilience in the face of loss. Amaranth flower meanings vary depending on the culture and context in which they are used.

Some common meanings associated with amaranth flower colours include:

  • Red: passion, love, and strength
  • Pink: gentleness, femininity, and love
  • Purple: royalty, nobility, and spirituality
  • Orange: warmth, happiness, and energy
  • Yellow: happiness, joy, and optimism
  • White: purity, innocence, and peace
  • Black: mystery, elegance, and sophistication.

Amaranth Flower Colour Meaning:

Amaranth is a reddish-pink colour, sometimes described as a deep shade of magenta or fuchsia. It is typically a bold, vibrant colour that stands out against other shades.

The colour amaranth is associated with love, passion, and intensity. It is also often associated with creativity, ambition, and determination. In some cultures, it is seen as a symbol of royalty, luxury, and wealth. In others, it is seen as a sign of rebirth and renewal.

Amaryllidaceae Family ~

The Amaryllidaceae is a family of herbaceous perennial plants that are commonly known as the Amaryllis family. This family includes a wide variety of plants, including bulbs, corms, and rhizomes, which are native to many regions of the world, including South America, Africa, and Asia. The flowers of Amaryllidaceae plants are typically large and showy, and they are often used in gardening and landscaping.

One of the most well-known genera in the Amaryllidaceae family is Amaryllis, which includes a number of species that are commonly used as ornamental plants. These plants are known for their large, trumpet-shaped flowers, which can be red, pink, white, or various shades of orange. The flowers typically bloom in the spring or summer, and they are often used to add colour to gardens and landscapes during these seasons.

Another important genus in the Amaryllidaceae family is Hippeastrum, which is commonly known as the “amaryllis” and is widely cultivated for its large, showy flowers. These plants typically produce one to three large, trumpet-shaped flowers per stem, which can be red, pink, white, or various shades of orange. They are often grown as indoor plants and are also widely used in gardens and landscapes.

The genus Narcissus, which includes Daffodils, is also part of the Amaryllidaceae family. Daffodils are one of the most popular spring-blooming flowers and are known for their bright yellow flowers and distinctive trumpet-shaped centres. They are also known for their hardiness and ability to naturalize, or spread and self-seed in gardens, parks and meadows.

Other genera in the Amaryllidaceae family include Clivia, which produces large, orange or red flowers in the spring; Sprekelia, which produces large, scarlet flowers; and Crinum, which produces large, fragrant flowers in shades of pink, red, or white.

In general, Amaryllidaceae plants are known for their large, showy flowers. They are also known for their hardiness and ability to thrive in a wide variety of conditions. They are also commonly used in cut flower arrangements and are considered as cut flowers for special events.

In conclusion, the Amaryllidaceae family is a diverse group of plants that are known for their large, showy flowers. They are widely cultivated for ornamental purposes and are used in gardens, landscaping, and cut flower arrangements. They are found in many regions of the world, and the most popular genera include Amaryllis, Hippeastrum, Narcissus, Clivia, Sprekelia, and Crinum.

Amaryllis ~

Symbolises ~ Pride, determination and radiant beauty.

For many years there was confusion among botanists, florists and seedsmen, over the generic names Amaryllis, Hippeastrum, Atamasco, Belladonna, and Jacobea lilies, from their superb, lily-like flowers. One result of which is that the common name “amaryllis” is mainly used for cultivars of the genus Hippeastrum, widely sold in the winter months for their ability to bloom indoors. Plants of the genus Amaryllisre known as belladonna lily, Jersey lily, naked lady, amarillo, Easter lily in Southern Australia or, in South Africa, March lily due to its propensity to flower around March. This is one of numerous genera with the common name “lily” due to their flower shape and growth habit. However, they are only distantly related to the true lily, Lilium.

The root is similar to a large onion, either tapering upward or flattened, according to the species; the leaves thick, long and narrow; the flower-stalk about a foot high. They are grown in pots, either as window or greenhouse plants. The Amaryllis receives its name from a nymph, mentioned in the Eclogues of Virgil, where Corydon thinks the cruel anger and proud disdain of Amaryllis was easier to bear than the cool indifference of Alexis, whom he so madly loved.

Andromeda ~

Symbolises ~ Bound by fate.

Native to northern parts of the Northern Hemisphere. It is the only member of the genus Andromeda, and is only found in bogs in cold peat-accumulating areas.

Cepheus, an ancient king of Aethiopia, had a very proud and haughty wife named Cassiopeia, and a daughter Andromeda. His wife was so vain of her beauty that she contested with Juno for the supremacy. For such temerity, Jupiter issued a decree that her daughter should be bound to a rock on the coast, that she might be devoured by sea-monsters. Perseus, a son of Jupiter, and adopted son of the king of Seriphos, undertook an expedition against the Gorgon Medusa, and upon his return discovered the luckless Andromeda languishing in the cords that bound her, and after overcoming dangerous obstacles, rescued and married her. Her name was given to a constellation in the heavens, and botanists have also named this little shrub in her honour.

 

Anemone ~

Symbolises ~ Anticipation, hope, renewal, and new beginnings.

The Anemone flower, also known as the windflower, delicate flower that is native to parts of Europe, Asia, and North America. It has been cultivated and used in various cultural settings for centuries, with different meanings and symbolism attributed to it depending on the culture and context in which it is used.

One of the most common cultural meanings of the Anemone flower is hope and renewal. In many parts of the world, it is associated with the coming of spring and the rebirth of nature. This symbolism is often seen in springtime bouquets, where the bright colours of the Anemone are meant to represent the hope and promise of new beginnings.

In some cultures, the Anemone flower is also seen as a symbol of protection and good luck. It is often used in arrangements to bring good fortune and to ward off negative energies. In this context, the bright colours and bold petals of the Anemone are often seen as a metaphor for the strength and resilience of the human spirit.

The main flower colours of the Anemone flower are white, pink, purple, and red. These colours are often chosen to represent hope, renewal, and good luck, as mentioned above. However, the Anemone flower can also be found in other shades, such as yellow, orange, and blue. These colours may carry different symbolic meanings depending on the context in which they are used.

The Anemone flower has a long history of use in various cultural settings. It is believed to have been cultivated and used in ancient Greece and Rome, where it was seen as a symbol of protection and good luck. In the Middle Ages, it was also widely used in religious ceremonies and rituals as a symbol of hope and renewal.

When purchased and placed at a cemetery or grave site, the Anemone flower can carry a variety of symbolic meanings. In some cultures, it is seen as a way to honour and remember the deceased, and to express hope and renewal for the future. In other cultures, it is seen as a symbol of protection and good luck, and a reminder that even in death, there is always the potential for new beginnings.

In summary, the Anemone flower is a versatile and widely-recognized symbol of hope, renewal, and good luck. Its bright colours and bold petals make it a popular choice for a variety of cultural and symbolic purposes, and it continues to be widely used and appreciated around the world today.

Angelica ~

Symbolises ~ Inspiration.

Angelica is a genus of about 60 species of tall biennial and perennial herbs in the family Apiaceae, native to temperate and subarctic regions of the Northern Hemisphere, reaching as far north as Iceland, Lapland, and Greenland. They grow to 1 to 3m (3 ft 3in – 9ft 10in) tall, with large bipinnate leaves and large compound umbels of white or greenish-white flowers. Found mainly in China, its main use was for medicine.

The Angelica plant is the largest of the species, the stalks attaining the height of from four to six feet. It grows usually in a wild or half-naturalized state, in fields and meadows, possesses strong aromatic properties, and is sometimes used in medicine. The garden Angelica is supposed to be a native of Labrador, and is the plant cultivated and used the same as celery, the blanched stalks adding a good relish when other salads are scarce. The poets of Lapland fancied they derived inspiration from wearing it as a crown; hence its application.

 

Apocynum ~ Apocynum Androsaemifolium

Symbolises ~ Falsehood.

Apocynum, commonly known as Dogbane or Indian hemp, is a small genus of the flowering plant family Apocynaceae. Its name comes from Ancient Greek ἀπόκυνον apókunon, from ἀπο ~ apo “away” and κύων kúōn” dog”, referring to dogbane (Cionura erecta), which was used to poison dogs. The genus is native to North America, temperate Asia, and south eastern Europe.

According to Pliny, some of the species were supposed to be fatal to those animals, as is, indeed, the extract of one of the genus, which is obtained from the seeds of the Strychnos Nux Vomica of India. It is sold under the name of Strychnine, and is fatal not only to the canine race, but to all animal life. This plant is about a metre in height, with opposite leaves from 5cm to 7cm long, rounded at the base, and sharp at the point. The flower is small, white, striped with red, and is rather pretty.

Apple Blossom ~

Symbolises ~ Preference.

The blossom is sweet-scented, and has a delicate pink flush. An orchard in bloom is a charming sight.

In Greek mythology, the Greek hero Heracles, as a part of his Twelve Labours, was required to travel to the Garden of the Hesperides and pick the golden apples off the Tree of Life growing at its center.

The Greek goddess of discord, Eris, became disgruntled after she was excluded from the wedding of Peleus and Thetis.  In retaliation, she tossed a golden apple inscribed Καλλίστη (Kalliste, sometimes transliterated Kallisti, “For the most beautiful one”), into the wedding party. Three goddesses claimed the apple: Hera, Athena, and Aphrodite. Paris of Troy was appointed to select the recipient. After being bribed by both Hera and Athena, Aphrodite tempted him with the most beautiful woman in the world, Helen of Sparta. He awarded the apple to Aphrodite, thus indirectly causing the Trojan War.

The apple was thus considered, in ancient Greece, sacred to Aphrodite. To throw an apple at someone was to symbolically declare one’s love; and similarly, to catch it was to symbolically show one’s acceptance of that love. An epigram claiming authorship by Plato states:

I throw the apple at you, and if you are willing to love me, take it and share your girlhood with me; but if your thoughts are what I pray they are not, even then take it, and consider how short-lived is beauty.

— Plato, Epigram VII.

Apricot ~ Prunus Armeniaca

Symbolises ~ Temptation.

The common Apricot widely cultivated for its edible fruit. The Apricot is thought to have originated in Armenia, but which is also found in the countries adjacent, and as far east as the Celestial Empire and Japan. Its introduction into Europe is said to have been effected by Alexander the Great, since whose time it has been generally cultivated there. The tree is medium in size, being from to 6 meters in high. The flowers are white, and make their appearance in spring time, before the putting forth of the leaves. The fruit is of a purplish-golden hue, from 2 to 7cm in diameter, and is palatable either to be eaten in its natural state or made into a preserve or jelly. The Apricot is cultivated all over the world with the most producing countries being Turkey, Uzbekistan, Iran, Italy, Algeria, United States, and thrives best in a temperate or warm to cool climates.

Araceae Family.

Family of: Monocotyledon

The family Araceae, commonly known as the arum family, is a large and diverse group of flowering plants found in tropical and subtropical regions around the world. The family is characterized by having flowers that are highly modified and often appear as small spadix, which are spike-like structures that are surrounded by a bract or leaf-like structure called a spathe.

Araceae plants are herbaceous, meaning they have no woody stems, and can be found in a variety of habitats including swamps, marshes, and rainforests. Many species are epiphytic, meaning they grow on other plants and derive their nutrients from the air and surrounding environment rather than from the ground.

The flowers of Araceae plants are unique in that they are typically unisexual, meaning they have separate male and female flowers. The male flowers are located on the upper part of the spadix and produce pollen, while the female flowers are located on the lower part and produce ovules. Pollination in Araceae plants is often done by insects, such as beetles or flies, that are attracted to the sweet odours produced by the flowers.

One of the most well-known and popular genera within the Araceae family is the genus Philodendron, which includes a wide range of tropical vines and shrubs. These plants are popular for their attractive, heart-shaped leaves and are often grown as houseplants. Another well-known genus is the genus Anthurium, which includes a variety of colourful, long-lasting flowers that are popular in cut flower arrangements.

Other notable genera within the Araceae family include the genus Zantedeschia , which includes the popular Calla Lily, and the genus Dieffenbachia, which includes a variety of popular houseplants known for their large, patterned leaves.

Overall, the family Araceae is a diverse and fascinating group of plants that are known for their unique and often showy flowers.

Arbutus ~ Epigaea Repens

Symbolises ~ Simplicity

Arbutus is a genus of 12 accepted species of flowering plants in the family Ericaceae, native to warm temperate regions of the Mediterranean, western Europe, the Canary Islands and North America. The name Arbutus was taken from Latin, where it referred to Arbutus unedo.

The Arbutus infrequently called Trailing Arbutus, and sometimes Mayflower, this plant is found in mountainous and hilly districts in our Northern States and British America. It is a procumbent shrub, and derives its botanical name from epi and gaea, two Greek words signifying lying on the ground, from the habit of the plant. The flowers appear in spring. They are white, frequently with a blush of red cast over them, and are very fragrant. It has been suggested that this plant be adopted, under the name of Mayflower, as the floral emblem of England, corresponding to the Rose of England, the Fleur-de-lis of Fiancé.

Arethusa. ~ Arethusa Bulbosa

Symbolises ~ Fear.

Arethusa bulbosa, commonly called Dragon’s Mouth Orchid, is the only species in the orchid genus Arethusa.  The genus is named after a naiad of Greek mythology.

It derives its name from Arethusa, a nymph of great beauty, who served in the suit of the goddess Diana. She attracted the attention of the river-god, Alpheus, while bathing in his river, the Alpheius of Arcadia. He immediately fell in love with her perfections, and she fled away abashed. To save her from his pursuit, she was changed by Diana into a fountain.

Damp places, such as swamps and low, marshy meadows, are the chosen retreats of this beautiful plant. Each plant bears (”’one handsome, large, fragrant flower, of a rich purple hue.

Aristolochia ~ Aristolochia Sipho

Symbolises ~ Prodigality

Aristolochia is a large plant genus with over 500 species that is the type genus of the family Aristolochiaceae. Its members are commonly known as Birthwort, pipevine or Dutchman’s pipe and are widespread and occur in the most diverse climates.

Aristolochia is a climbing shrub found in our Middle and Southern States, generally in upland woods, frequently attaining the height of thirty feet or more. The leaves are large and heart-shaped, arranged alternately on each side of the stem. The flowers are particularly striking, blooming singly, each tube being long and turned up in the form of a tobacco-pipe, and of a brownish colour. Hence the shrub is frequently called Dutchman’s Pipe. The Aristolochia Bonplandi, a fine plant for greenhouse culture, is a native of Patagonia, and, like some two or three others, thrives best in the warm, moist air of the hothouse. The flowers of all have the same peculiar structure; the colours are purple or a greenish brown, some of them being beautifully spotted.

In some cultures, Aristolochia flowers are often used as a symbol of rebirth and renewal when placed at a cemetery. These exotic and unusual flowers are known for their distinctive shape and unusual appearance, which is thought to represent the idea of transformation and rebirth.

In Mexican culture, for example, Aristolochia flowers are often used to adorn the graves of loved ones who have passed away. The unique and unusual appearance of these flowers is thought to symbolize the idea of transformation and the possibility of a new beginning in the afterlife. Additionally, the flower’s ability to thrive and bloom in difficult conditions is seen as a symbol of the human spirit’s resilience and strength.

In Chinese culture, Aristolochia flowers are also commonly used at cemeteries. These flowers are believed to symbolize the idea of reincarnation and the continuous cycle of life and death. The unusual shape and appearance of the flowers are thought to represent the different stages of life, from birth to death and beyond.

In many cultures, Aristolochia flowers are also used as a way to honour and remember the deceased person’s memory. The unique and striking appearance of these flowers is thought to represent the person’s unique and individual spirit, as well as the idea of transformation and renewal. Additionally, the flowers’ ability to thrive and grow even in difficult conditions is seen as a symbol of the human spirit’s resilience and strength.

Overall, the use of Aristolochia flowers at a cemetery is a deeply meaningful and symbolic gesture in many cultures around the world. These exotic and unusual flowers are often used to honour and remember the deceased, as well as to symbolize the idea of rebirth and the strength and resilience of the human spirit.

Arnica ~ Arnica Montana

Symbolises ~ Strength and Resilience. Let me heal thy grief.

The arnica flower is often used in cemeteries to symbolize healing and comfort. The flower is believed to have medicinal properties and has been used for centuries to treat various ailments, including bruises, sore muscles, and inflammation. Its use at a cemetery may therefore be seen as a way to offer comfort and healing to those who are grieving the loss of a loved one. In some cultures, the arnica flower is also associated with strength and resilience, making it a fitting symbol of hope and healing during times of loss and hardship.

Asteraceae Family.

The family Asteraceae, commonly known as the Daisy family, is a large and diverse group of flowering plants found in a variety of habitats around the world. The family is characterized by having flowers with a distinctive form known as a composite flower, which consists of many small, individual flowers called florets arranged in a circular pattern on a central disk.

Asteraceae plants are herbaceous or woody and can be found in a variety of habitats including grasslands, wetlands, and forests. Many species are known for their bright, showy flowers that are popular in cut flower arrangements and as garden plants.

The flowers of Asteraceae plants are typically unisexual, meaning they have separate male and female flowers. The male flowers, also known as staminate flowers, are located on the outer part of the composite flower and produce pollen. The female flowers, also known as pistillate flowers, are located on the inner part of the composite flower and produce ovules. Pollination in Asteraceae plants is often done by insects, such as bees and butterflies, that are attracted to the nectar produced by the flowers.

One of the most well-known and popular genera within the Asteraceae family is the genus Chrysanthemums, which includes a wide range of colourful garden plants. Another well-known genus is the genus Helianthus, which includes the popular Sunflower.

Other notable genera within the Asteraceae family include the genus Coreopsis, which includes a variety of popular garden plants known for their bright, daisy-like flowers, and the genus Echinacea, which includes a variety of popular medicinal plants known for their immune-boosting properties.

In summary, the family Asteraceae is a diverse and important group of plants that are known for their showy, composite flowers. They are popular in both horticultural and medicinal circles and have a long history of cultivation and use.

Aster ~ Asteraceae.

Symbolises ~ love, faith, patience, peace, tranquillity, resilience, strength, and good fortune.

The Aster flower, also known as Asteraceae, is a member of the Asteraceae Family. This flower is native to the Northern hemisphere, and has been cultivated for centuries in gardens and wild meadows.

In terms of cemetery and gravesite symbolism, the Aster flower has a long-standing tradition of symbolising patience and daintiness. It is also associated with the end of summer and the coming of fall.

The Aster flower is available in a wide variety of colors, including pink, purple, white, blue, and yellow. Each colour has its own symbolic meaning, with purple symbolizing royalty, blue symbolizing wisdom and patience, white symbolizing purity and innocence, and yellow representing hope.

The Aster flower has been used in funerals and memorial services since ancient times. The ancient Greeks and Romans believed that the aster flower was able to ward off evil spirits, and it was often placed on graves to protect the deceased. In medieval Europe, the aster was also used in funeral wreaths to symbolise the end of life.

In European cultures, the aster flower is associated with the Virgin Mary, and it was often used in religious art and iconography. In Asian cultures, the Aster flower is associated with the autumn season and represents a time of change and transition.

When purchasing an Aster flower for a cemetery or gravesite, the symbolic meaning of the colour should be taken into consideration. A purple Aster can be placed on a royal family member’s grave to symbolize their status, while a white aster can be placed on a loved one’s grave to symbolize purity and innocence.

Faux version of Aster flowers is also a popular choice for gravesites and cemetery uses as they are weather resistant and can last a long time. The Faux version of the Aster flowers are made of materials like silk, plastic, or other synthetic materials and can be used as a permanent memorial for the deceased.

In conclusion, the Aster flower is a versatile and meaningful flower that has been used in funerals and memorial services for centuries. Its various colors and cultural associations make it a fitting tribute for loved ones who have passed away. When purchasing an Aster flower for a cemetery or gravesite, it is important to consider the symbolic meaning of the colour, and also consider the Faux version of the aster flowers as a long-lasting option.

Aster Faux Flowers

Honour your loved one’s memory with an Aster Faux Flower that symbolises enduring love and remembrance. Show them how much they mean to you by choosing a long-lasting option. Shop Now to make your special tribute.

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Auricula ~

Symbolises ~ purity, innocence, and humility.

The Auricula flower is often associated with trust, loyalty, and purity. In many cultures, it is seen as a symbol of fidelity and honesty, and it is often given as a gift to express these sentiments. The Auricula is also known for its delicate beauty and delicate fragrance, making it a symbol of elegance and grace. In some traditions, the Auricula is believed to have healing properties, and it is often used in herbal remedies to promote health and well-being.

Azalea ~

Symbolises ~ Temperance, femininity and delicate beauty.

Azalea flowers are often associated with femininity, beauty, and fragility, making them a popular choice for use at cemeteries. In many cultures, azalea flowers are seen as a symbol of love and devotion, and they are often used to honour the memory of a loved one. The delicate and fragrant petals of azalea flowers can also help to create a peaceful and soothing atmosphere at a cemetery or gravesite, and they can serve as a reminder of the beauty and grace of the deceased.

Some specific meanings that are associated with azalea flowers in different cultures include:

  • In Chinese culture, azalea flowers are often seen as symbols of womanhood and femininity. They are associated with the principles of yin and yang, and they are often used to honor the memory of a loved one who embodied these principles.
  • In Japanese culture, azalea flowers are associated with danger and the fragility of life. They are often used to honour the memory of those who have died young or unexpectedly, and they serve as a reminder of the fleeting nature of life.
  • In Western cultures, azalea flowers are often associated with love and devotion. They are often given as gifts to express affection and admiration, and they are often used to honor the memory of a loved one who was deeply loved and respected.

Overall, the use of azalea flowers at a cemetery can help to express the deep emotions and sentiments of those who are grieving, and they can serve as a lasting tribute to the memory of the deceased. Whether they are used to express love and devotion, or to honour the memory of a loved one who embodied the principles of yin and yang, azalea flowers can help to create a meaningful and enduring tribute to the deceased.

A to Z ~ Flowers Types + Meanings + Colours + More, Index.